JavaScript must be enabled in order for you to use the Site in standard view. However, it seems JavaScript is either disabled or not supported by your browser. To use standard view, enable JavaScript by changing your browser options.

| Last Updated:20/11/2018

Latest News

Archive

Impact of Ithai Barrage on Loktak and surrounding held

 By A Staff Reporter

IMPHAL | Dec 19

A one day workshop on “Impacts of Ithai barrage on livelihood of natives settled within and in peripheral areas of Loktak Lake” organised by Centre for Study of Social Exclusion and Policy, Manipur University was held at the conference hall of Anthropology department today.

During the workshop many scholars, social activists, academicians and experts have presented their research or findings on the impact to Loktak Lake.

Prof. W. Bishwanath speaking on the topic ‘A broad overview of Ithai barrage and its impacts on Loktak ecosystem” said that over exploitation, water pollution, modification of water flow, habitat degradation, and species invasion are factors contributing causing imbalance to the diversity of Loktak Lake.

Endangering species is one of the serious problems that are being face in region of Eastern Himalayas, he said.

He pointed out that as per International Union for Conservation of Nature 15 species from Eastern Himalayan region are in the endangered list of which 7 to 8 species is from Manipur.

Underscoring the several importance of the lake, he said “Lake is regarded as flood control mechanism and support life to many species living inside the water bodies by maintaining temperature and pressure. So the responsibility of saving the fate of Loktak Lake lies in our hand.”

State co-ordinator of Indian Bird Conservation Network (IBCN) R.K. Birjit, speaking on Ithai barrage and impacts of migratory waterfowl population, said that in 1990 Ramsar Convention had declared Loktak Lake as Ramsar site. However, noting the sudden decline in fish population and migratory birds, he raised his doubt whether the Lake could still be deemed as Ramsar site. read more>>